Thoreau bean-field essay in walden

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The meanings of Walden Pond are various, and by the end of the work this small body of water comes to symbolize almost everything Thoreau holds dear spiritually, philosophically, and personally. Certainly it symbolizes the alternative to, and withdrawal from, social conventions and obligations. But it also symbolizes the vitality and tranquility of nature. A clue to the symbolic meaning of the pond lies in two of its aspects that fascinate Thoreau: its depth, rumored to be infinite, and its pure and reflective quality. Thoreau is so intrigued by the question of how deep Walden Pond is that he devises a new method of plumbing depths to measure it himself, finding it no more than a hundred feet deep. Wondering why people rumor that the pond is bottomless, Thoreau offers a spiritual explanation: humans need to believe in infinity. He suggests that the pond is not just a natural phenomenon, but also a metaphor for spiritual belief. When he later describes the pond reflecting heaven and making the swimmer’s body pure white, we feel that Thoreau too is turning the water (as in the Christian sacrament of baptism by holy water) into a symbol of heavenly purity available to humankind on earth. When Thoreau concludes his chapter on “The Ponds” with the memorable line, “Talk of heaven! ye disgrace earth,” we see him unwilling to subordinate earth to heaven. Thoreau finds heaven within himself, and it is symbolized by the pond, “looking into which the beholder measures the depth of his own nature.” By the end of the “Ponds” chapter, the water hardly seems like a physical part of the external landscape at all anymore; it has become one with the heavenly soul of humankind.

The answer to question 2 accurately notes that "Thoreau is no true socialist," but fails to flesh out the primary foundation to support the statement. Socialism is a political force that is firmly rooted in collectivism where the mob (. "society") uses the force of gov't to impose its will on the individuals in the minority. Thoreau clearly abhorred such vile abuse of power. He was a staunch individualist whose actions and writings were universally and diametrically opposed to use of force by the state to impose on people he understood we... Read more →

In 1860 Thoreau caught a severe cold which became bronchitis, then tuberculosis. He died on May 2, 1862. There are two famous deathbed stories, both characteristic of Thoreau's iconoclastic mind. When a meddlesome friend tried to turn his thoughts toward a future life, he said, "One world at a time." When a relative asked whether Thoreau had made his peace with God, he answered, "I am not aware that we have ever quarreled."

Thoreau bean-field essay in walden

thoreau bean-field essay in walden

In 1860 Thoreau caught a severe cold which became bronchitis, then tuberculosis. He died on May 2, 1862. There are two famous deathbed stories, both characteristic of Thoreau's iconoclastic mind. When a meddlesome friend tried to turn his thoughts toward a future life, he said, "One world at a time." When a relative asked whether Thoreau had made his peace with God, he answered, "I am not aware that we have ever quarreled."

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thoreau bean-field essay in walden