Fun book report ideas

On a whim, I bought this book in September 2009, as my son was completing his senior year at a public high school in Northern California. Our family benefited tremendously from the stories related in this book. The two most important ideas we implemented were to have our son take the ACT, as the author pointed out that some students perform better on either the ACT or SAT and that colleges establish equivalence between scores on both tests. At that point, he had taken the SAT twice and did fine but not in the range for the schools he had in his sights. He had just enough time to sign up for the ACT in October for it to count for his college apps. He performed so much better on the ACT that our younger daughter plans to only take the ACT, saving the SAT experience just for the subject tests. The other valuable piece of information were the chapters on the essay. Our son took to heart the advice to BE YOURSELF in the essay, writing his personal story of finding motivation and purpose through his relationship with a jazz musician. His essay beautifully explained his somewhat puzzling lackluster performance in high school during his first year and a half and how he became inspired to achieve. By the time he applied to colleges, he had a strong GPA, close to 40 units of college credit taken at the local community and state colleges, and four AP exams with a score of 5. He applied to 11 schools and was accepted at 8, waitlisted at 1, and rejected at 2. However, he was accepted at each of his top three schools and is now a freshman at one of the top-rated liberal arts schools in the nation. If you have a child who doesn’t fit the typical valedictorian profile, READ THIS BOOK. Colleges don’t want schools full of “perfect” students; they want a freshman class that is interesting and diverse. Once you read this book, you and your child will understand this reality and will be able to develop a plan to put together an interesting and unique application that truly reflects who your child is. Think of the folks reading the applications – they will recognize and respond to a voice of authenticity. I believe it’s the best way to stand out among the thousands of applications they will read.
. My son’s high school has 2,000 students and 5 counselors. If you do the math, that means each counselor has a case load of 400 students, which is ridiculous. All that to say that our family was almost totally on our own with the college application process.

Book Reports: A Type of Expository Essay
A book report is usually written as an expository essay, although it can be written in other forms. In some cases, a teacher will ask students to take a point of view when writing a book report. Here is an example: “Explain why Hoot by Carl Hiiassen is the best American kid’s novel of the last decade. Please use examples.” This type of writing prompt requires a persuasive style of writing. Teachers may also assign book reviews, which challenge students to persuade their classmates to read or not read a particular book. If writing a book review, don’t reveal the ending!

Fun book report ideas

fun book report ideas

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